Adam Grabowski interacts with students and prospective Bearcats

Apr 20th, 2017 | By | Category: 2016-2017, Lifestyles

By Dorian Grayson
Staff Writer

On Thursday April 13, Smith Auditorium was nearly a third full with current and prospective students to hear comedian Adam Grabowski. Grabowski is a comedian who has performed at over 600 campuses, and has been on “America’s Got Talent.” Before Grabowski got on stage, loud, outdated music greeted the incoming audience, as did an on-stage projection that advertised his Instagram, Snapchat and Twitter.

Soon enough he got on stage, with a smooth transition that included making the person introducing him dance. He was charismatic with effective interaction with the audience. Knowing his audience, he started with jokes about politics and people’s voting habits.

“There’s one person in the back who said ‘I voted for Harambe!’ You’re the reason the country went wrong!” Grabowski said.

He then went on to ask the audience to give him any reason to like Trump. A few people responded, and he shut them down before transitioning into a joke about how somebody in Mississippi said that we should like Trump because he’s white.

Grabowski offered the audience a choice: a smooth, practiced routine, or an honest, rambling, soul-searching show.

“Who wants to hear me break down?” he said.

The audience chose the latter, which he started with a gender-based joke that started by acknowledging gender as a spectrum, but was still based in a binarist conception.

“Men only encourage each other when they’re going to do something really stupid,” said Grabowski.

He then segued into a ‘feminine’ joke, which was a surprisingly hilarious joke about a standoff where neither girl wants to be the one to poop first.

The laughs continued as Grabowski moved to a familiar joke about female telepathy, saying they’ll laugh and communicate from just looking at each other. After having women in the audience look at each other, inevitably laughing, he attempted to ‘telepathically’ communicate with a man in the audience, having him guess what Grabowski was thinking. The man in the audience said ‘Tacos.’ Grabowski told the audience he had only ever heard two responses from this joke: “Titties and tacos.”

Grabowski’s lofty ambitions stretched farther than just humor, though. Near the end of the show he brought the energy down and opened up. He told the audience he suffers from depression and anxiety.

“From August to November [during my tour] I cried every day … I couldn’t shake that feeling,” Grabowski said. “We make ourselves feel bad for feeling bad. Don’t do that.”

He went on to talk about the importance of talking about emotions, experience and mental health. Grabowski handed out a bag of bracelets, encouraging the audience to take some. On the bracelets it says #SayItAnyway and has “You’re Not Alone” in raised letters on the inside. His show, he proclaimed, was about the empathy we need to increase for everyone, including ourselves.

Afterwards he brought the energy of the show back up, encouraging the audience to ask him questions. He excelled at taking audience input and turning it into incredibly funny material. Someone asked what the worst thing he’d been sent over Snapchat was, and he told the story of the “oops butt.” Someone had sent him a picture of their butt, with “oops” over it.

“That’s not an oops!” Grabowski said. “You don’t do that on accident!”

Before the end of the show, he wanted to put the audience on his Snapchat story. Everyone stood up, turned around with their butts facing the camera, and said “Oops!”

 

dgrayson@willamette.edu

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